aasplogo.jpg (7152 bytes)      

 

Back to Recent News

Go to U.S.
News Archive

International
News Archive

 

 

 

Home Page What's New About AASP Contact AASP
Members Join AASP Guestbook Site Map
 

Globe3.gif (11596 bytes)

 

International News Archive
June 01 - June 06, 2000

 

Archive3.gif (2046 bytes)

 
 

 

This page contains news for the period June 01, 2000 through June 06, 2000.

 

 

<<   June 2000  >>

S M T W Th F S
        1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30  

 

 

June 1, 2000

Egypt dismisses Internet divorce case

A story published today by the Associated Press reports that an Egyptian court has refused to uphold a divorce notice sent by a Muslim man to his wife by e-mail, saying Islamic laws cannot be interpreted to accept electronic documents as evidence, court officials said Thursday.

The report says that it is Egypt's first reported case involving divorce by Internet, which is still a limited medium in this country of only about 50,000 Internet users among a population of 65 million.

The ruling Monday by the Civil Status Court in the northern city of Alexandria was a shock to the woman, Jaclyn Farouk, who had accepted the divorce notice and had remarried.

Farouk went to court when her first husband, Hisham Mahmoud, changed his mind about the divorce and threatened to sue her if she did not leave the man she had married.

Farouk, a university student, told the court that she remarried only after Mahmoud sent her an e-mail advising her he was divorcing her. He sent the e-mail from a foreign country where he is studying on a scholarship.

According to Islamic law, a man can obtain a divorce by uttering the words "I divorce you'' three times.

Farouk presented a copy of the divorce e-mail in court, but the judge refused to accept it as evidence, said the officials, speaking on customary condition of anonymity.


Law Commission wants Canada to move legal protections beyond sexual relationships

A story published today by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation reports that the the Law Commission of Canada has released a discussion paper about what it calls "close personal relationships between adults." The reviews are mixed on what it says about the Canadian family.

The report suggests that the government consider giving any two adults who have an interdependent relationship the same benefits as the law gives to unmarried partners in a sexual relationship, known in Canada as "common-law partners."

Under current law, unmarried heterosexual couples are given most of the legal protections and benefits of married couples. The national parliament is likely to extend those protections this year to couples in a homosexual relationship. The commission's proposal is to extend the same or similar protections to nonsexual relationships as well if the parties are interdependent. This would include unmarried blood relatives or close friends in a nonsexual relationship.

The Law Commission says adults who live together and rely on each other could have perks such as health and pension benefits. But they could also take on responsibilities for children and maintenance.

The Law Commission says its time for Canada's laws to catch up with the new definition of family. Which includes single parents, gay couples, or elderly parents that live with their children.

The discussion paper is meant to spark debate across the country. It seems to be succeeding.

To read a summary of the report and gain access to links to the full report and background papers submitted to the Commission, click here.

Egypt dismisses Internet divorce case

A story published today by the Associated Press reports that an Egyptian court has refused to uphold a divorce notice sent by a Muslim man to his wife by e-mail, saying Islamic laws cannot be interpreted to accept electronic documents as evidence, court officials said Thursday.

The report says that it is Egypt's first reported case involving divorce by Internet, which is still a limited medium in this country of only about 50,000 Internet users among a population of 65 million.

The ruling Monday by the Civil Status Court in the northern city of Alexandria was a shock to the woman, Jaclyn Farouk, who had accepted the divorce notice and had remarried.

Farouk went to court when her first husband, Hisham Mahmoud, changed his mind about the divorce and threatened to sue her if she did not leave the man she had married.

Farouk, a university student, told the court that she remarried only after Mahmoud sent her an e-mail advising her he was divorcing her. He sent the e-mail from a foreign country where he is studying on a scholarship.

According to Islamic law, a man can obtain a divorce by uttering the words "I divorce you'' three times.

Farouk presented a copy of the divorce e-mail in court, but the judge refused to accept it as evidence, said the officials, speaking on customary condition of anonymity.

 

Home Page What's New About AASP Contact AASP
Members Join AASP Guestbook Site Map